El futuro de la energia

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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 04 Mar 2013 06:19

La paridad en la red es el término empleado para describir el momento en el que a un usuario le sale más rentable obtener la energía de una fuente propia, en este caso fotovoltaica, que obtenerla de su distribuidor.

En España, gracias a nuestro buen clima y muchas horas de sol, esa paridad se logró holgadamente durante el año 2012 para casi todo el territorio, salvo las zonas más al norte, aunque esto se logrará a medida que bajen los precios de instalación.

Una hogar tipo español gasta 671,89 euros anuales en la factura de la luz

Supongamos que tenemos una casa en Madrid, donde las instalaciones dan un rendimiento de 1.400KWh/KWp (es lo habitual en nuestro país). Eso quiere decir que necesitaríamos colocar unos 2,5KWp para llegar a cubrir el consumo de 3.500 KWh anuales (1,400 × 2,5 = 3.500).

El coste de dicha instalación, partiendo de un precio de mercado medio de 1,5 euros por Wp instalado, es de 3.750 euros (1,5 × 2.500), y podría ser menor, ya que los precios no dejan de bajar, y se pueden encontrar hasta de 1 €/Wp.

Con unos números rápidos podemos calcular el periodo de amortización: 3.750/671,89 = 5,6 años. Es decir, que en poco más de cinco años habríamos cubierto los costes de instalación y a partir de ahí la energía eléctrica nos saldría prácticamente gratis (hay unos gastos mínimos de mantenimiento) hasta el fin de la vida útil, que se estima en no menos de 25 años.



Fuente: ennaranaja
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 28 Mar 2013 09:43

Since the Kyoto Protocol, China’s consumption of renewable energies, though still half that of the USA’s, has been averaging growth of 20 per cent a year. Moreover, judging by patents filed in the field of environmentally friendly technologies, this trend looks well set to continue: China registered a mere 0.41 per cent of international patents in this area in 1995 whereas that percentage had climbed to 14 per cent by 2009, matching that of the USA. This implies that China alone has accounted for 20 per cent of the total increase in patents in environmental technologies in the last 15 years.

China and the USA may be the main sources of polluting emissions worldwide, but all countries clearly appear determined to reduce their carbon footprints. Although renewable energies still account for only a tiny 1.6 per cent of total energy consumed, encouragingly, this source of energy has enjoyed the fastest growth since 1995.
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 18 Abr 2013 11:22

DESERTEC releases criteria for large-scale solar

• Saudi solar receives DESERTEC endorsement
• China's SGCC interested in Desertec
• DESERTEC and ADEREE sign MoU on renewables

http://www.desertec.org/

http://www.dii-eumena.com/
Desertec stands for the vision of a sustainable energy supply from the deserts all over the world. Dii is a private industrial consortium working towards enabling this vision in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (EUMENA). The power generated from sun and wind is intended primarily to meet the local demand of the producer countries, but could also be exported to Europe. The overall objective of Dii is to create a market for renewable energy from the deserts.
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 18 Abr 2013 11:25

UK Tidal Power could generate up to 20%

Despite high costs, experts say tidal power is more reliable than wind. An analysis says that estuary barrages and tidal streams could provide more than 20% of the nation's demand for electricity. The predictable nature of tides makes them an ideal renewable energy source. Essentially, engineers try to tap tides in two ways: one involves building barrages across tidal estuaries that use the ebb and flow of the waters to turn turbines - a major project of this type had been proposed for the River Severn. The other method involves planting turbines underwater in fast flowing tidal streams in areas such as in coastal waters around Cornwall and Scotland. In the past month, the EU has announced funding in the region of £30m for two UK tidal projects. Investors in tidal technology are currently rewarded with a payment of £40 per MWh.
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 23 Abr 2013 11:33

Philippines generates energy using trash: The Philippines is turning rubbish into clean energy - and the move's proving to be popular
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 11 Jul 2013 11:03

Sea could be fuel of the future: Scientists in Australia have found a way to turn seawater into fuel, suggesting it could help ease the pressure on oil demand in the future
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 14 Nov 2013 16:15

Microsoft is touting the use of fuel cells to power data centers, arguing in a paper released Tuesday that its studies find it a technology with much potential.
The paper, boldly titled "No more electrical infrastructure: Towards fuel cell powered data centers," investigates fuel cells as a centralized power source and as distributed power generation technology with fuel cells used at the rack or single server cabinet level.
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 25 Feb 2014 13:14

Like fracking, UCG is not a new technology. In fact, Sir William Siemens (the brother of the founder of the German engineering firm) came up with the basic idea in 1868.

He believed that if you set fire to the coal in a mineshaft it would produce gas, which could then be collected, eliminating the need for manual extraction. The first serious tests were carried out in the Soviet Union in the 1930s. By the 1960s, five plants were using the process.

The discovery of more accessible natural gas supplies dampened interest. But researchers kept improving the techniques. As a result, the technology is now much more sophisticated.

Instead of digging a mineshaft and starting a fire (as fraught with potential problems as it sounds), the more modern take on UCG is to drill a hole into the seam and then inject oxygen and water to set it alight. The gas then exits through another hole.

As with shale gas, this process has its critics. The big concern is that if the pressure is too high, tar can be formed, which can get into the water supply. The other big worry is that the underground cavity created by the destruction of the coal could also collapse.

However, if the pressure is strictly controlled, then the amount of tar produced is relatively small, and will be filtered out by surrounding rocks. Tests carried out in Spain in the 1990s seem to vindicate this approach.

There are also benefits to this approach, according to the coal industry. Harmful vapours, such as sulphur dioxide, can be captured during the process and stored underground for less than the cost of conventional mining. The World Coal Association reckons that UCG could reduce levels of particulates (such as ash) released in mining by up to 50%. They also point out that toxic waste, such as mercury, is kept safely underground.

A final benefit is that the disruption above ground is far lower than any other form of mining.

As a result, several emerging countries are starting to buy into this technology. China’s desire to secure its energy supply while reducing pollution has made it the leader in UCG, with more than 30 projects underway. India has also announced an ambitious scheme to tap into around 350bn tonnes of deep buried coal.
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 09 Mar 2014 07:51

Perovskita, mineral barato y eficaz para generar energía solar

Otro avance que llamó la atención de la revista es el desarrollo activo de paneles solares elaborados a partir del mineral perovskita.

La perovskita es barata y fácil de manejar. Es capaz de convertir hasta el 15% de la energía solar en electricidad, pero cada año los científicos mejoran sus propiedades.

Fuente: http://actualidad.rt.com/ciencias/view/ ... antes-2013
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Re: El futuro de la energia

Mensajepor Dalamar » 30 Abr 2014 04:53

70% of Sub-Saharan Africa lacks access to reliable electricity. Often, kerosene-fueled lighting makes up for this lack of access, but those who use kerosene lighting must live with the fumes. Some suggest that four hours spent inhaling kerosene fumes is roughly equivalent to smoking 40 cigarettes. Now, Bloomberg Philanthropies has invested $5 million in a revolutionary solar lamp that can self-charge in sunlight and last 3 years on one battery, paving the way for what could be both an energy and a public health breakthrough.
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