Proximos avances en medicina

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Dalamar
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Proximos avances en medicina

Mensajepor Dalamar » 07 Oct 2012 13:47

Visto en Moneyweek:

"Some Parkinson's patients already receive neural implants. Researchers are looking for ways to make them last longer and work better. We could see major breakthroughs in both those metrics within a decade.

Telemeters strand repair and infrared light therapy, coupled with these new findings, will let us cross the brain-blood barrier with drugs targeted to specific cells. That is a game changer

The blood-brain barrier is critical for the survival of the species. It's there to let nutrients in but keep deadly agents and infections out. But it also presents major challenges when it comes to delivering medicines and other therapies that could treat brain disorders. It's one of key things holding this field back.

A Harvard team used the protein clathrin to cross the blood-brain barrier, this or a similar type of tech will someday lead us to a whole new class of nanotech drugs that can fight brain diseases."
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Dalamar
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Proximos avances en medicina

Mensajepor Dalamar » 21 Oct 2012 15:02

Leo:

Adult Stem Cell Cures Are Ready to Blow the Lid Off the Market

A research team from Columbia University is responsible for this one. Their findings center on induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

These are adult cells - culled from a patient's own skin - that are tweaked to induce embryonic properties. Team members noted that, just like embryonic ones, IPS cells can grow to become a wide range of different human tissues and organs.

In this case, the transformed human skin cells were shown to restore vision in blind mice who suffered from macular degeneration.

In the study, team members got the IPS cells from a donor who is 53 years old. They added a cocktail of growth factors for use in the eyes of 34 blind mice that had a genetic mutation that caused their retinas to break down over time.

Control mice that got either saline or dormant cells showed no improvement in their vision. But mice that received the treatment had better vision that lasted well into old age.

"It's often said that iPS transplantation will be important in the practice of medicine in some distant future," noted team leader Dr. Stephen Tsang. "But our paper suggests the future is almost here. With eye diseases, I think we're getting close to a scenario where a patient's own skin cells are used to replace retina cells destroyed by disease or degeneration."

And it gets better...

Even better, the mice retinas took hold of the human cells without any problems and no major side effects.

"Importantly, we saw no tumors in any of the mice," Dr. Tsang added. That "should allay one of the biggest fears people have about stem-cell transplants, that they will generate tumors."
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