Microbiota

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Microbiota

Mensajepor Dalamar » 26 Nov 2015 05:57

Gut Bacteria In Charge Of Telling Brain You're Full

Gut microbes could be responsible for letting the brain know when you're full. Gut microbes could be responsible for letting the brain know when you're full.
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Re: Microbiota

Mensajepor Dalamar » 26 Nov 2015 05:59

Diets should be personally tailored to your gut microbiome, study says

Even if we all ate the same meal, everyone would metabolise it differently, according to a new study that suggests that there is no such thing as one-size-fits-all dietary advice.

In the first part of the study, 800 volunteers — some healthy, some with pre-diabetes — were hooked up with devices that continually monitored their blood sugar levels, and equipped with an app to record their every move and meal.

Over one week, this revealed dramatic differences in each person's blood sugar response to different foods.

"We would expect that in average people, their blood sugar would spike more on ice-cream than rice," Dr Elinav said.

"What we found in this really large cohort is that some people did exactly that but others did exactly the opposite.

"They were not responsive to ice-cream at all, and actually close to 70 per cent of the study population did not even spike on ice-cream."

At the same time, researchers took blood and sampled each individual's gut bacteria, looking not only at the makeup of their gut bacteria but also the functional profile of the microbiome.
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Re: Microbiota

Mensajepor Dalamar » 26 Nov 2015 06:02

11/20/2015 - A Canadian researcher has discovered what might be a big step toward preventing celiac disease. Dr. Elena Verdú, an associate professor at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, has found that bacteria in the gut may contribute to the body's response to gluten.

Hobvias SudoneighmIf her discovery pans out, it may be possible to treat, or even prevent, celiac disease by changing the the type of bacteria in the gut. "By changing the type of bacteria in the gut, we could change the inflammatory response to gluten," says Verdú.
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Re: Microbiota

Mensajepor Dalamar » 18 Ene 2016 13:25

Fuente: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/54 ... n-the-gut/

Scientific discoveries in recent years suggest that some serious conditions could be cured by adding “good” bacteria to your digestive tract. Now several companies are racing to develop drugs that do so.

It’s a jungle in there: massive populations of microbes, immune cells, and cells of the gut tissue are interacting and exchanging countless chemical and physical signals. Disruptions to this complex ecosystem, often called the microbiome, have been linked not only to gastrointestinal problems but also to metabolic, immunological, and even neurological disorders.

One such problem, which occurs when a very common species of bacteria, Clostridium difficile, colonizes the gut and becomes too abundant, can be cured by adding good bacteria to the digestive tract—but the method for doing so requires a transplant of another person’s feces, and the reasons it works are not well understood. The next generation of microbiome medicines will instead be “real drugs” that are “easy to take, clean, and safe,” says Roger Pomerantz, CEO of Seres Therapeutics.

Instead of directly modifying the microbial environment as Seres does, three-year-old startup Synlogic is developing genetically engineered bacteria, derived from species native to the human gut, that can be introduced and live in the microbiome without changing its overall composition. From there the engineered bacteria can perform therapeutic functions, like removing unwanted substances the body is retaining as the result of a metabolic disorder. The company draws on established methods from synthetic biology to introduce “genetic switches” so the microbes can sense and respond to their environment.
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