Impresoras en 3D

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Dalamar
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 15 Jun 2013 11:59

Pues si! Habra que tomar posiciones...
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 24 Ago 2013 14:09

Now, a few biotech companies are exploring this new frontier in science with hopes of creating tissues and organs for medical research and therapeutic applications. One of those, San Diego-based Organovo, has developed a bioprinting method to create strips of liver tissue, about 20 cells thick, to use for experimental drug testing. The company is focusing on liver cells because of their wide use in the laboratory to evaluate the potential toxicity or efficacy of drugs.

Organovo listed on the NYSE MKT, a trading venue with the NYSE Euronext market, on July 11. Also last month, it forged an important partnership with Springfield, VA-based Methuselah Foundation, in which the regenerative medicine-focused public charity said it would commit to funding research at major academic institutions that use Organovo's proprietary NovoGen bioprinting technology.

Organovo presented its first fully cellular 3-D bioprinted liver tissue data in April at the 2013 Experimental Biology conference in Boston. According to the company, this was the first time truly 3-D human liver tissues were generated from bioprinting. The tissue produced is made up of multiple cell types arranged in distinct spatial patterns that replicate features of natural tissue architecture. The company reported that the tissue "demonstrated excellent functional characteristics that replicates human biology better than what has come before."

Then there's Austin, TX, biotech startup TeVido BioDevices, which is developing a 3-D printing process that could fabricate breast tissue for use building custom implants and grafts for breast cancer patients.
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 06 Oct 2013 07:37

Students build racing car with 3D printer

Students from Changsha in China have used new 3D printing techniques to build a racing car
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 01 Nov 2013 18:47

Via UBS' Andrew Cates,

For those readers who are not yet aficionados on this technology we start with a brief explanation. Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques (a.k.a. 3D printing) create 3D objects directly from a computer model by depositing material where required and by building products up layer by layer using a range of different materials (e.g. polymers, ceramics, glass and even metals).

This stands in contrast to conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques which involve taking blocks of material, cutting them down into the right shape, and assembling them into more complex products. The technology is admittedly still in its infancy and it suffers from a range of limitations at present. However, we think the optimists who argue that this technology will be revolutionary have a strong case. As one author has quipped:

“This is not the third (industrial revolution), nor the second, but rather the first real revolution in how we make things since a pre-historic man picked up two rocks and started banging them against one another, trying to shape them into something useful” (Dr Alexander Elder)
The technology has not yet generated a major impact on the world economy. A recent report from UBS analysts, for example, noted that the AM market (USD 2.2 billion) amounted to just 0.02% of the global manufacturing sector. Still, as the analysts equally noted, the technology is starting to spread more broadly both at a sector-specific and at a country-specific level. A recent report from Wohlers Associates, for example, reveals that AM is now used in a number of different economic sectors with consumer products/electronics the leading industrial area. The motor vehicle and aerospace sectors are also keen users while the medical/dental profession has additionally established itself as a strong sector for AM over the last few years (see chart 1 below).

The technology is - at present - particularly advantageous in low-to-moderate volume markets (e.g. aerospace) that regularly operate without economies of scale.

At a country-specific level the data from that same report from Wohlers reveals that the US is the lead user by a large margin. Japan, Germany and China have the second, third and fourth largest installed bases, respectively, of systems worldwide (see chart 2 below).

There are a number of reasons why the technology has not yet had a bigger impact. Challenges include production speed, materials availability, precision and control. Issues concerning legal responsibility are also problematic. Still, as we explore below, incentives to overcome these challenges clearly exist because of the potential advantages that the technology affords. And matters at present may already be moving more rapidly than many of the pessimists might contend. The use of nanotechnology, for instance, could mean that plastics in 3D printing soon rival the strength of metals in more conventional manufacturing.

Meanwhile the printing of human kidneys, of houses, of hamburgers (and other food products) and even – in the distant future - of an aeroplane are being actively researched and in some of those cases (e.g. houses and hamburgers) even printed.

The reasons why the technology has so much potential are as follows:

It lowers energy intensity by saving energy, by eliminating production steps, by enabling the reuse of by-products by producing lighter products and by cutting the need for transportation. It is in these respects obviously environmentally-friendly as well.

AM techniques yield less waste. The US Department of Energy estimates that by building objects layer by layer instead of traditional machining processes that cut away material AM processes could reduce material needs and costs by up to 90%.

It heightens incentives to innovate by eliminating traditional design restrictions. It makes it possible, for example, to create items previously considered too intricate and accelerates final product design. The ability to improve performance and functionality – literally customizing products to meet individual customer needs – should open new markets and improve profitability.

It yields greater flexibility in the production process by enabling rapid response to markets and new production options outside of the manufacturing factory. Spare parts can be produced on demand, for example, reducing the need for inventory and complex supply chains.
In short the technology enriches the capital base and enhances the scope for an economy to achieve faster capital- and total factor productivity growth. Its disruptive qualities emerge from the ongoing fall in its relative costs and the increasingly broad reach of its potential. Arguably of most significance from the vantage point of potential global economic benefits the technology lowers the barriers to entry in manufacturing and allows almost anyone to become an entrepreneur.

As we have explored in more detailed research in recent weeks there are a large number of technologies that are rising to the surface of the world economy at present which offer a great deal of promise. AM in isolation would arguably not be so potent were it not for these other innovations that are acting alongside it. The marriage of nanotechnology and AM techniques is perhaps the bestillustration of this. But the increasingly connected world economy via the increasing use of mobile and cloud technology and the ease with which digital designs can now be transported around the planet are notably also helping to foster the take-up and deployment of AM techniques.

We have tentatively estimated that the efficient deployment of new technologies in the information and communications sector, in manufacturing (including AM) and in energy could lift the potential growth rate of the world economy by as much as 0.5 percentage points in the coming years. The winners from this potential transformation, however, are more likely to be those economies, sectors, companies and consumers that are active users of these new technologies and not necessarily its active producers.
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 11 Nov 2013 18:22

The ability to create 3D scans which can then be printed also opens up the prospect of large scale counterfeiting for example. US researchers Gartner Group suggest that 3D printing could result in the loss of at least $100bn a year in intellectual property (IP) globally by 2018. As an example they identify the automotive aftermarket where higher priced products from the original equipment manufacturer are vulnerable to cheap copies. But there will also be fresh opportunities for companies specialising in brand protection and product validation.
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 13 Nov 2013 14:07

Chinese bio-printer could ease organ shortage

Researchers in China have developed a 3D bio-printer which could create functional human body parts within the next 20 years.
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 14 Nov 2013 22:21

In less than 12 months, it's gone on a 398% run.

This is a company that specializes in 3D bioprinting.
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 24 Nov 2013 18:49

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (NYSE: GS) recently said that 3D printing is already a $2.2 billion market and will reach $10.8 billion by 2021.

Credit Suisse Group AG (NYSE ADR: CS) has an even more aggressive forecast for the sector, stating that sales will grow from about $3 billion today to $11 billion by 2020. Credit Suisse says 3D printing is already taking hold in the healthcare and aerospace sectors, and says each of these markets will race along at a 30% compound annual growth rate (CAGR).

But the real growth will come from the consumer market, the investment banking firm says.

"The consumer market is the fastest-growing portion of the 3D printing market, with expectations for 100%+ YoY growth in 2013," Credit Suisse analysts wrote in their recent report. "Makerbot [owned by Stratasys Ltd (Nasdaq: SSYS)] describes its offering as intended for the 'pro-sumer' market (manufacturer's suggested retail price is $2,200-$2,800), expecting many systems to be dual professional/personal use among small business owners or serious hobbyists. 3D Systems' 'Cube' (MSRP $1,200+) is marketed by DDD as a true 'consumer' printer."

The Credit Suisse report was written before 3D Systems introduced a new 3D digital photo scanner called the Sense.
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girado007
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor girado007 » 24 Nov 2013 20:29

Esto ya empieza a ser serio.

http://www.elconfidencial.com/tecnologi ... ida_57859/

Si le ponen un palito a la comida generada, podemos estar ante el nuevo invento del siglo español, tras el chupachups, la fregona, el futbolin...

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Dalamar
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Re: Impresoras en 3D

Mensajepor Dalamar » 25 Nov 2013 07:09

Yo ya lo dije en inbestia, la proxima burbuja la de las impresoras 3D, y no es que no sean un buen invento, pero como todas las burbujas se crean demasiadas expectativas y se infla hasta el infinito calculando unas rentabilidades futuras irreales, para explotar y luego si... poco a poco madura la tecnologia que si puede ser util... lo mismo paso con las .com, burbujon y luego si poco a poco va funcionando la cosa...

http://inbestia.com/blogs/post/la-proxi ... resoras-3d

El oro lo mismo, expectativas de hiperinflacion absurdas, burbujon, reventon y luego si, poco a poco llegara a su punto de equilibrio equiparando con la cantidad de dinero impreso y la inflacion moderada que debe de generar.
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