Cafe

Alimentos que tienen unas propiedades especialmente benficiosas para la salud!
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 30 Mar 2015 19:36

According to research conducted by the London, UK-based World Cancer Research Fund International, drinking three alcoholic drinks a day can be enough to cause liver cancer.

Amanda McLean, Director of World Cancer Research Fund UK, says: "Around three or more drinks per day can be enough to cause liver cancer. Until now we were uncertain about the amount of alcohol likely to lead to liver cancer. But the research reviewed in this report is strong enough, for the first time, to be more specific about this."

The findings were published in the Continuous Update Project (CUP) 2015 report on "diet, nutrition, physical activity and liver cancer." They are based on an analysis of 34 studies that included 8.2 million people - more than 24,500 of whom had liver cancer.

The American Cancer Society estimates that each year in the US there are around 35,660 new cases diagnosed with liver and around 24,550 people that die from liver and intrahepatic duct cancers.

Evidence emerged from the same research finding strong evidence that drinking coffee can reduce the risk of liver cancer. This discovery follows research the World Cancer Research Fund published in 2013 showing that coffee reduced the risk of womb cancer.

Dr. Kate Allen, Executive Director of Science and Public Affairs at World Cancer Research Fund International, says:

'Significantly decreased risk of liver cancer' per one cup of coffee per day

Mechanisms that support a protective effect of coffee on liver cancer relate largely to studies in animals, although some human studies contribute to the evidence.

Both coffee and coffee extracts have also been shown to reduce the expression of genes involved in inflammation, and the effects appear to be most pronounced in the liver.

There is evidence from small intervention studies that coffee consumption reduces DNA damage in blood cells and prevents ex vivo-induced DNA damage in healthy volunteers.

Specifically, the study determined that the risk of developing liver cancer might be reduced by approximately 14% if individuals consume one cup of coffee per day.
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 21 Nov 2015 15:44

El cafe parece ser beneficioso, que no tanto la cafeina... entre 3 y 5 tazas al dia.

La cafeina parece tener efecto protector con respecto al Parkinson, pero el resto de beneficios del cafe se pueden conseguir con el descafeinado.

In a fresh-brewed study involving more than 200,000 people, researchers found that drinking coffee—regular or decaf—is associated with an overall lower risk of mortality. Drinking between three and five cups a day perked up survival rates the most, lowering the risk of premature death by up to 15 percent compared to coffee abstinence, researchers reported Monday in Circulation.

Though the study reveals only a correlation—not a potential cause for the life-upper—it follows decades of studies that found specific and general health benefits of coffee drinking, particularly lower risks of cardiovascular disease, liver diseases, diabetes, and overall mortality. Plus, the study’s large size helps parse other health factors, particularly smoking, that may conceal coffee’s protective effects.

The authors, led by Frank Hu of Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, concluded that the “results from this and previous studies indicate that coffee consumption can be incorporated into a healthy lifestyle.”

For the study, Hu and colleagues analyzed health records of more than 200,000 people, mined from three large clinical trials that included doctors, nurses, and other health professionals. In those trials, participants were periodically given food questionnaires and followed for up to 30 years, during which 30,000 participants died.

Combining all the data, researchers found that drinking up to five cups of coffee a day lowered the risk of all-cause mortality by 5 to 9 percent compared to drinking no coffee. Drinking more than five cups a day had no association with mortality risk, the authors found.

But, people who drink a lot of coffee also tend to be smokers, epidemiologist Hannah Gardener, of the University of Miami, told Ars. And this may have been a bitter note for previous research.

Many observational studies have found that moderate coffee consumption can lower mortality risks, but effects in heavy coffee drinkers have been a point of debate, she said. “Many studies did not have the size and power to look at this group of coffee consumers carefully.”

The new study did, however. When Hu and colleagues chucked smokers from their analysis, they found that mortality risks fell for moderate and heavy coffee drinkers. Non-smoking java-junkies that throw back more than five cups a day had a mortality risk 12 percent lower than non-drinkers. Non-smokers that partake in three to five cups a day had a 15 percent lower mortality risk than non-drinkers.

“Drinking high amounts of coffee may, in fact, not be bad and may possibly be beneficial for health similar to the consumption of moderate amounts of coffee,” Gardener said.

When Hu and colleagues examined the data more closely, they also found coffee consumption was linked to lower risks of cardiovascular disease, neurological disease, and suicide. They saw no link to total cancer mortality, however.

Dozens of studies have looked into specific health effects of coffee over the years, many of which have resulted in conflicting results—but not all, Christina Bamia, professor of epidemiology and medical statistics at the University of Athens, told Ars.

Links between coffee and diseases such as liver cancer and type 2 diabetes have been investigated in many studies, she said, “and findings are rather consistent in showing a benefit associated with coffee consumption.”

In relation to liver health, previous studies have suggested the caffeine and other unknown elements of coffee can block liver scarring, fat deposition, and cancer. In terms of diabetes, studies have found that caffeine and coffee components including chlorogenic acid, lignans, quinides, trigonelline, and magnesium could reduce insulin resistance and systematic inflammation. Because diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common disease pathways, the authors say their finding of lower risk of cardiovascular disease makes sense, as well.
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 17 Dic 2015 07:06

A parecer el beneficio del Cafe depende bastante de un gen CYP1A2 que hace que se metabilice mas lento, uno que precisamente yo si tengo.

Intake of coffee was associated with an increased risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction only among individuals with slow caffeine metabolism, suggesting that caffeine plays a role in this association.


Fuente: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16522833

CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between coffee intake and the risk of hypertension.

These data show that the risk of hypertension associated with coffee intake varies according to CYP1A2 genotype. Carriers of slow *1F allele are at increased risk and should thus abstain from coffee, whereas individuals with *1A/*1A genotype can safely drink coffee
.

Fuente: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25595320

These data show that coffee consumption increases the risk of impaired fasting glucose in hypertension particularly among carriers of the slow CYP1A2 *1F allele
.

Fuente: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25595320

Somewhat stronger relations of coffee and caffeine intake to risk were found among women with cruciferous vegetable consumption above the median and among cases with mucinous histology. These preliminary data suggest a modest positive association of caffeine and coffee consumption with the OR for ovarian cancer that may be modified by CYP1A2 genotype and exposures, such as cruciferous vegetable consumption, that influence CYP1A2 expression.


Fuente: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12925300

The CYP1A2 genotype modifies the association between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk among BRCA1 mutation carriers.

A significant protective effect of coffee consumption was not observed among women with the CYP1A2 AA genotype (OR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.49-1.77). Similar results were obtained when the analysis was restricted to caffeinated coffee. This study suggests that caffeine protects against breast cancer in women with a BRCA1 mutation and illustrates the importance of integrating individual genetic variability when assessing diet-disease associations.


Fuente: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17507615
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 18 Dic 2015 13:39

Mas genes...

The study appears online October 7, 2014 in Molecular Psychiatry.

Genetics have long been suspected of contributing to individual differences in response to coffee and caffeine. However, pinpointing the specific genetic variants has been challenging.

The researchers, part of the Coffee and Caffeine Genetics Consortium, conducted a genome-wide meta-analysis of more than 120,000 regular coffee drinkers of European and African American ancestry. They identified two variants that mapped to genes involved in caffeine metabolism, POR and ABCG2 (two others,
AHR
and CYP1A2 had been identified previously). Two variants were identified near genes BDNF and SLC6A4 that potentially influence the rewarding effects of caffeine. Two others—near GCKR and MLXIPL, genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism—had not previously been linked to the metabolism or neurological effects of coffee.

The findings suggest that people naturally modulate their coffee intake to experience the optimal effects exerted by caffeine and that the strongest genetic factors linked to increased coffee intake likely work by directly increasing caffeine metabolism.

“The new candidate genes are not the ones we have focused on in the past, so this is an important step forward in coffee research,” said Cornelis.
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 30 Mar 2017 18:31

Fuente: http://www.timelesslifemag.com/index.ph ... -sirt12-3/

The overall health picture for coffee consumption for non cancer affected coffee drinkers however dims with these results. Combined with the previous study it would appear that coffee drinking results in inhibition of SIRT1,2 and 3 whose activity is connected to longevity and health. Moreover it would mean that coffee counteracts the effects of NAD+ boosting with compounds like nicotinamide riboside.


Malo.. malo...
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 11 Jul 2017 09:44

El cafe con o sin cafeina, reduce la mortalidad de todo tipo, de forma considerable (12%-18%):

A team from the National Cancer Institute, USC and the University of Hawaii sought to correct that by examining coffee-drinking habits in 185,855 Americans who were participating in the Multiethnic Cohort Study, which has been tracking volunteers since 1993. On average, each volunteer was followed for 16.2 years.

Compared with the 16% of people who didn’t drink coffee at all, those who downed two or more cups each day were about 18% less likely to have died during the study period. In addition, those who drank just one to six cups of coffee per week were 12% less likely to die. Both of these figures were calculated after taking into account known risk factors for early death, such as smoking (which is often paired with coffee drinking), diet and body mass index.

The more coffee one drank, the less likely he or she was to die of heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes or kidney disease.

Coffee apparently had no effect on the risk of dying of influenza or pneumonia, Alzheimer’s disease, accidents or suicide.

A second study mined data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study to see whether there was a link between coffee and early death among 521,330 people from 10 countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom). These volunteers were tracked for an average of 16.4 years.

Once again, the researchers (most of whom were from Europe) found that the top 25% of coffee drinkers in each nation were less likely to die during the study period than their countrymen who shunned coffee altogether. After accounting for smoking, diet and other factors, the authors calculated that the risk of early death was 12% lower in men and 7% lower in women.

Both studies found similar results for people who drank decaffeinated coffee as for people who drank the real thing.

Both groups of researchers also noted that previous studies have linked coffee drinking to improvements in the body’s liver function, sensitivity to insulin and inflammation.
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 29 Ago 2017 17:50

Presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Barcelona, Spain, the study was based on findings from 20,000 people who were tracked for an average of 10 years, according to USA Today.

Researchers tracked the coffee consumption of the subjects, who completed a questionnaire that also recorded their lifestyle characteristics and prior health.

For those who drank at least four cups of joe a day, the study found, there was a 64 percent lower risk of death than those who never or rarely consumed coffee. And for those over 45, there was a 30 percent lower chance of death if they drank another two cups of coffee on top of that.


Cifras muy importantes...

Fuente: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat ... 607381001/

Two new studies reveal that drinking coffee can have long term health benefits, and the more cups the better.

One study determined that drinking one cup of coffee daily reduced the risk of death from heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, respiratory and kidney disease by 12 percent, and by 18 percent for those drinking three cups a day.

The study responsible for these findings was led by Veronica W. Setiawan of the University of Southern California. The National Cancer Institute funded study followed 180,000 people of different races for an average of 16 years.

The second study, led by Marc J. Gunter of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, was conducted by European scientists from Imperial College London and looked at more than 520,000 coffee drinkers across 10 European countries.

Both studies were published in the Annals of Internal Medicine and asked participants about their coffee drinking habits, as well as health habits including smoking, exercise and heart disease.


Fuente:http://www.foxla.com/news/share-this/267274868-story
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Re: Cafe

Mensajepor Dalamar » 01 Feb 2018 20:09

Parece que el proceso de creacion del cafe esta ligado a componentes cancerigenos, habria que ver la probabilidad real...
Adjuntos
CafeCancer.JPG
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